Work With Crocodiles Project

Menu: Click across the green arrows to view active and completed project stages. Consultation takes place at every stage of the project.

Case for change

Crocodile farming is a growing industry in the northern states of Australia, but it is yet to fully mature. The sale of crocodile skins, meat, by-products, as well as associated tourism and conservation markets have made crocodile farming a significant factor in the labour markets and economies of remote communities in the Northern Territory, Western Australia and Queensland.

Changes in legislation have been a major driver of the growth of this industry, with Queensland enacting legislation as recently as December 2018 to allow for controlled collection of wild crocodile eggs. This reflects similar legislation in the Northern Territory in the early 1980s that saw the development of the contemporary commercial crocodile farming sector in Australia.

For Australian crocodile farming to continue its success in international markets, it is important to retain a reputation for safe, effective and sustainable operations. There is a need to consult with industry about current work practices and job roles in order that these can be captured in units of competency. There is a need for consultation with a diverse range of stakeholders to capture the different work environments for working with crocodiles and meet the the needs of remote and Indigenous communities.

This project was first proposed as part of the 2019-2022 Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC Skills Forecast and Proposed Schedule of Work (see pages 40-47). It was later approved by the Australian Industry and Skills Committee (AISC) after an additional submission outlining the potential scope of the project.

Skills Impact and the Aquaculture and Wild Catch Industry Reference Committee (IRC) will manage this project, consistent with the 2012 Standards for Training Package Development.

Download Project Proposal 

 

Project Plan

Handling crocodiles is a specialist skill, whether in the wild, on farms or in zoos. It is a complex field, overlapping with a number of sectors that include aquaculture and wild catch, conservation and land management, and animal care and management.

Conservation plays a key role, with crocodile management programs in place to outline the requirements of all work with crocodiles, recognising the reptile as a natural resource with both economic benefits and cultural value. Crocodile farms operate within these guidelines, acknowledging the importance of crocodile conservation to the longevity of the sector. As such, workers need skills in sustainable farming practices, including the monitoring of crocodile populations in the wild and aiding with scientific research. Unique skills are also required on farm to incubate eggs and monitor hatchlings, and to feed and care for animals.

In addition to farm workers, the handling of crocodiles and their eggs is performed by park rangers, zoo employees, and licenced individuals. Crocodile farming is also closely linked with Indigenous communities, providing economic benefits for Traditional Owners through employment and royalty payments for egg collection on their land. While those with experience have developed and honed techniques for working with crocodiles, skills standards have not been defined within the national vocational education and training system.

Broad consultation with industry will continue throughout this project to describe the skills needed for all kinds of work with crocodiles. Advice from Indigenous communities will be an important part of consultation activities. We recognise that crocodiles have been part of Indigenous culture for thousands of years, as both respected entities and a source of food. We also acknowledge the challenges involved for people who are not related to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islanders to understand the significance of this connection and will therefore seek advice and guidance from Indigenous people.

Project Scope

The project will address the need for accessible skills standards for working with crocodiles. The focus will be on developing units of competency that can be used across all forms of work with crocodiles, to promote safe and sustainable practices.

 

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Relevant Occupations
  • Crocodile farmer
  • Crocodile farm worker
  • Crocodile farm manager
  • Crocodile hatchery worker
  • Crocodile hatchery manager
  • Crocodile rancher (egg collection in the wild)
  • Crocodile handler
  • Crocodile catcher
  • Indigenous and Park Rangers
  • Animal Protection Officers
  • Zoo worker – crocodile handler and feeder

 

Project Team

Susie FalkIndustry Skills Standards Specialist, Skills Impact sfalk@skillsimpact.com.au
Michelle Ingley-SmithIndustry Engagement Manager, Skills Impact michelle@skillsimpact.com.au
Anna HendersonIndustry Skills Standards Contractor

Timeline

September – October 2019
Initial scoping

October – November 2019
Development of draft qualifications, skill sets and units

December 2019 – February 2020
Drafts available for broad consultation

February – March 2020
Validation of final drafts

March 2020
Finalisation of Training Package components

April – May 2020
IRC consideration for sign-off and submission for endorsement

 

Subject Matter Experts

Subject Matter Experts will be drawn on throughout this project to help review and draft the revised units, skill sets and qualifications.

If you are interested in applying to be a subject matter expert and are able to volunteer your time to this project, please email details of your expertise to sfalk@skillsimpact.com.au

Opportunities for stakeholder input

Stakeholder input is appreciated throughout the duration of this project. The documents will be drafted in consultation with Subject Matter Experts and their networks. Opportunities to provide targeted feedback will occur when the draft materials are made available in September 2019, and again for validation of final drafts in December 2019. However, your feedback is welcomed at any time, and will help us in drafting the qualifications, skill set and units. It is important that training provides a skilled and flexible workforce for the future. The qualifications, skill sets and units need to reflect real work experience. So if you work in the sector, Skills Impact would love your input and help. Please feel free to register your interest for project updates and consultation opportunities by following the newsletter subscription link below. Alternatively, please feel free to contact the project manager, Name on 03 9321 3526 or sfalk@skillsimpact.com.au.

Stakeholder Consultation Process

A list of key stakeholder organisations has been identified for this project. Skills Impact will ensure contact is made with each of these organisations during the development of this project to seek their involvement and their views on the draft qualifications, skill sets and units.

If you are aware of an organisation that you think should be involved, please contact the project team to ensure they are contacted by us.

Of course, all and any interested industry participants are encouraged to engage in the consultation of this project, when the draft qualifications, skill sets and units are available for feedback via this webpage and workshops that take place around Australia. Consultation is not limited to the organisations on this list. This list simply helps us to identify those organisations that, because of their industry role, size or specialty, are likely to have a key interest in the development and outcomes of this project.

Development

Working with crocodiles is a specialist skill required in a range of sectors including aquaculture and wild catch, conservation and land management, and animal care and management. Whether in the wild, on farms, in zoos or in wildlife parks, skills are required to interact with crocodiles, their eggs and their environment in a sustainable, safe and humane way.

Members of the Skills Impact team have been consulting with Subject Matter Experts to gather information about the knowledge and skills required to work with crocodiles.

While there are some unique skills required to work with crocodiles on farms versus in the wild, essential skills are common to both environments. These skills include awareness of zoonotic diseases, welfare of both the crocodile and human, cultural sensitivity, biosecurity, risk awareness and assessment, and the humane treatment of crocodiles.

Farming any species is a responsibility. Training staff to understand that crocodile welfare is the pinnacle from where crocodile farming begins is imperative. Maximising welfare and farm production output are 100% aligned so having staff that are trained in this philosophy will ensure that animals are humanely farmed with appropriate access to food and housing requirements as well as being able to prevent and recognise disease early to reduce reliance on antibiotics. These, in turn, will increase the production output of farms and allow further expansion of this sustainable use industry with broad-reaching community benefits.”

Dr Sally Isberg, Managing Director at Centre for Crocodile Research

Consultation Workshops – Registrations Open!

Thank you to those stakeholders that have been involved and provided feedback and advice so far.

The draft units of competency and skill sets will be made available on this webpage for broad stakeholder consultation and feedback in January and February, 2020 (under the ‘Drafts Available’ menu above). Face-to-face consultation workshops will also take place, with a webinar planned for those unable to attend in person.

Registrations for these workshops are now open. Please feel free to register for a workshop near you by clicking the corresponding link.

Face-to-face consultation workshops

Venues to be confirmed

Cairns QLD – Tue 18 Feb 2020, 10am – 12 noon (AEST) – Register here

Jabiru NT – Tue 25 Feb 2020, 10am – 12 noon (ACST) – Register here

Katherine NT – Thu 27 Feb 2020, 10am – 12 noon (ACST) – Register here

Broome WA – Fri 28 February 2020, 2:30pm – 4:30 pm (AWST) – Register here

Consultation webinar

Fri 6 March 1 – 3pm (AEDT) – Register here

Visits to the NT

Members of the Skills Impact team have visited the Northern Territory for two Subject Matter Expert workshops. The open discussions during these two visits have already identified a need for several new units of competency, and associated skill sets, as well as a potential qualification. Further consultation is required to determine if these units will be placed as electives in the Certificate III in Aquaculture, Certificate III &/or IV in Conservation Land Management. Discussion about placement is ongoing.

While in Darwin, the Skills Impact team also visited the Crocodylus Park to learn about their breeding program and conservation work and see it all in action. They also met with experts on the Adelaide River to observe the ‘catch and release’ technique, witnessing first-hand how crocodile handlers and rangers safely and humanely relocate crocodiles who are injured, ill or a danger to humans.

As the skills for work with crocodiles cover a number of industry subsectors, it’s vital that consultation encompasses the full range of relevant job roles. Industry experts consulted during this development stage have included crocodile farm directors, supervisors and handlers, park rangers, wildlife officers, animal wranglers, research scientists, and a biosecurity officer, from QLD, WA and NT.

Another important element of this project is ensuring advice and feedback is received from Indigenous Australians, whose culture has respected crocodiles as entities and a source of food for thousands of years. Today, crocodile farming provides economic benefit for Traditional Owners through employment and royalty payments for egg collection on their land. Skills Impact is consulting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples throughout this project.

Click here to read about a recent visit to the Northern Territory.

Left to right: Susie Falk, Industry Skills Standards Specialist at Skills Impact; Craig Moore, Manager of Lagoon Crocodile Farm; Anna Henderson, Industry Skills Standards Contractor for Skills Impact; Debbie Knight, Industry Support Officer at Industry Skills Advisory Council NT; Michelle Ingley-Smith, Industry Engagement Manager at Skills Impact; Dr Charlie Manolis, Chief Scientist at Wildlife Management International; and Dr Sally Isberg, Managing Director at Centre for Crocodile Research.

 

Left to right: Peter Carstairs, Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions WA; Peter Freeman, Hartley’s Crocodile Farm; Calvin Murakami and Gary Lindner, Kakadu National Park; Vicki Simlesa, NT Department of Primary Industries & Resources; Michelle Ingley-Smith, Industry Engagement Manager at Skills Impact; Adam Britton, Big Gecko; Craig Althaus, Agsafe; Sally Isberg, Centre for Crocodile Research; Tom Nichols, NT Parks & Wildlife; Damien Cowan (HL Australia, QLD) and Susie Falk, Industry Skills Standards Specialist at Skills Impact.

 

 

Register your interest in the project

Subscribe to the Skills Impact newsletter to keep informed about project updates. Make sure to select ‘Aquaculture & Wild Catch’ as your industry of interest on the subscription form.

 

Drafts Available

Specialist skills are required to work with crocodiles in ways that are sustainable, safe and humane. While some of these skills are unique, depending on whether work is taking place in the wild, on a farm, in a zoo or in a wildlife park, many essential skills are common across environments. These skills include awareness of zoonotic diseases, the welfare of both crocodiles and humans, cultural sensitivity, biosecurity, risk awareness and assessment, and the humane treatment of crocodiles.

As well as being used in a range of environments, the skills required to handle crocodiles and their eggs are relevant across a range of sectors, including aquaculture and wild catch, conservation and land management, and animal care and management. However, at present only two crocodile specific units of competency exist; SFIPRO303 Slaughter and process crocodiles and SFIAQU216 Work with crocodiles. There is a need for a greater variety of nationally endorsed units to cover the many job tasks required to handle crocodiles in a safe and humane manner.

Thank you to those who provided feedback on the draft qualification, skill sets and units of competency that were made available on this webpage for feedback from 7 February – 9 March 2020. 

During this time, feedback was collected via the online feedback hub, four face-to-face consultation workshops, a webinar, and email. The drafts, including any comments made on the feedback hub, are still available for viewing below.

Feedback will inform the work on the final drafts which are expected to be available for industry validation in late March 2020. A summary of the feedback and how it was addressed in the final drafts will also be available.

Feedback was sought on whether the draft documents reflect the current skills standards and practices of industry, and whether job functions are accurately described. Feedback was encouraged about the level of detail in the proposed units and whether there is potential for any of them to be combined, as well as the groupings of units within the skill sets and whether a full qualification is necessary.

Farming any species is a responsibility. Training staff to understand that crocodile welfare is the pinnacle from where crocodile farming begins is imperative. Maximising welfare and farm production output are 100% aligned so having staff that are trained in this philosophy will ensure that animals are humanely farmed with appropriate access to food and housing requirements as well as being able to prevent and recognise disease early to reduce reliance on antibiotics. These, in turn, will increase the production output of farms and allow further expansion of this sustainable use industry with broad-reaching community benefits.”

Dr Sally Isberg, Managing Director at Centre for Crocodile Research

SFI20X20 Certificate II in Crocodile CareView draft qualification

The draft document can be downloaded in Microsoft Word format by clicking here.

Code and TitleLink
SFISSXXX11 Commercial crocodile farming skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX12 Crocodile breeding skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX13 Crocodile education skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX14 Crocodile egg harvesting with traditional landowners skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX15 Crocodile hatchling care skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX16 Crocodile incident skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX17 Crocodile relocation skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX18 Crocodile surveying skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX19 Crocodile tourism skill setView skill set
SFISSXXX20 Introduction to working with crocodiles skill setView skill set

The draft documents can be downloaded in Microsoft Word format by clicking here.

Code and TitleLink
SFICRO2X1 Prepare to work with crocodilesView unit
SFICRO2X2 Conduct crocodile farm operationsView unit
SFICRO2X3 Operate and maintain equipment or technology for work with crocodilesView unit
SFICRO2X4 Coordinate and maintain crocodile dataView unit
SFICRO3X1 Support crocodile hatchery operationsView unit 
SFICRO3X2 Capture, transport and release a crocodile 1.5 to 2.5 metresView unit
SFICRO3X3 Conduct crocodile surveysView unit
SFICRO3X4 Conduct crocodile farm operations with crocodiles over 1.5 metresView unit
SFICRO4X1 Manage crocodile incidentsView unit
SFICRO4X2 Carry out crocodile breeding activitiesView unit
SFICRO4X3 Harvest crocodile eggs in the wildView unit
SFICRO4X4 Capture, transport and release a crocodile that is over 2.5 metres in lengthView unit
SFICRO4X5 Euthanise or destroy crocodilesView unit
SFIPRO3X3 Slaughter and process crocodilesView unit

The draft documents can be downloaded in Microsoft Word format by clicking here.

 

Consultation to date

Over the past five months members of the Skills Impact team have been consulting with experts in the industry to revise and draft the qualifications and skills standards. Two visits to the Northern Territory took place for two Subject Matter Expert workshops. Job roles and tasks that need to be considered in the next five years were discussed, along with the specific skills and knowledge required to prepare individuals for these. Appropriate terminology was suggested, as well as the need for references to the use of technology. The issue of how competency, skills and knowledge may be assessed in the future was also discussed.

Initially the SMEs felt there was a need for separate units for ‘on farm’ and ‘in the wild’, however as the discussion progressed several similarities were found. Discussions included: on farm, in the wild, crocodile handling, egg collection, cultural sensitivity, use of technology, equipment, chemicals, drugs, safety and the need for effective communication both within the industry and with respect to the media.

The decision to propose the deletion of SFIAQU216 Work with crocodiles and to review SFIPRO303 Slaughter and process crocodiles were unanimous.

Thank you to those who have provided feedback to date, and a special thank you to those who welcomed Skills Impact into their workplaces and shared their knowledge and skills in crocodile handling to help us to better understand the needs of industry.

Gathering advice and feedback from Indigenous Australians is a key element of this project, as their culture has respected crocodiles as entities and a source of food for thousands of years. Today, crocodile farming provides economic benefit for Traditional Owners through employment and royalty payments for egg collection on their land. Skills Impact is consulting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples throughout this project.

For further insight into the consultation process so far, click here to read about a recent visit to the Northern Territory.

 

Register your interest in the project

Subscribe to the Skills Impact newsletter to keep informed about project updates. Make sure to select ‘Aquaculture & Wild Catch’ as your industry of interest on the subscription form.

 

Validation

Working with crocodiles in ways that are sustainable, safe and humane requires specialists skills and knowledge. While the skills required vary depending on whether work is taking place in the wild, on a farm, in a zoo or in a wildlife park, many of the foundational skills are relevant to any environment.

Common requirements for work with crocodiles and their eggs includes knowledge of zoonotic diseases, crocodile and human welfare, cultural sensitivities relating to Indigenous communities, biosecurity management, risk awareness and assessment, and the humane treatment of crocodiles. While these skills are relevant across a range of sectors, including aquaculture and wild catch, conservation and land management, and animal care and management, only two crocodile specific units of competency currently exist. A broader range of nationally endorsed skills standards are required to support work practices that are safe for both crocodiles and humans.

Thank you to those who provided feedback on the final draft qualification, skill sets and units that were made available on this webpage for feedback from 6 – 20 April 2020.

All documents are newly developed, including some units appropriate for working with crocodiles in any context and others suited to a specific work environment.  

The final drafts will shortly progress through to the Finalisation stage of the project which includes quality assurance of the documents and review and feedback from the State/Territory Training Authorities. They will then be forwarded to the Aquaculture and Wild Catch Industry Reference Committee (IRC) for consideration and sign off, before being submitted to the Australian Industry and Skills Committee (AISC) to consider and approve for publication on training.gov.au.

Farming any species is a responsibility. Training staff to understand that crocodile welfare is the pinnacle from where crocodile farming begins is imperative. Maximising welfare and farm production output are 100% aligned so having staff that are trained in this philosophy will ensure that animals are humanely farmed with appropriate access to food and housing requirements as well as being able to prevent and recognise disease early to reduce reliance on antibiotics. These, in turn, will increase the production output of farms and allow further expansion of this sustainable use industry with broad-reaching community benefits.”

Dr Sally Isberg, Managing Director at Centre for Crocodile Research

Key changes since the initial drafts

Prior to validation, the following key changes were made to better reflect job functions and tasks: 

  • Replacement of references to ‘crocodile farming’ in the documents with ‘crocodiles in a controlled environment in order to include working with crocodiles in research facilities, zoos and wildlife parks, as well as farms. 
  • Revision of the units’ Knowledge Evidence to ensure that it is concise and does not pose barriers to training delivery. 
  • Development of two new units to address remote communication and working safely in remote waterways in Northern Australia: SFICOM2X1 Communicate remotely and SFICRO2X5 Work safely in crocodile waterways. 
  • Crocodile size references amended from under 1.5 metres and over 1.5 metres to under 1.2 metres and over 1.2 metres as this was seen to be more appropriate as a distinction point. 
  • Deletion of redundant draft and existing units because industry stakeholders indicated that they do not accurately address current job roles. This has included the deletion of SFIPRO303 Slaughter and process crocodiles. The other existing unit SFIAQU216 Work with crocodiles was already proposed for deletion in the first draft. 
  • Number of proposed new units of competency reduced from 14 to 11. 
  • Refinement of the draft skill sets, including reduction from ten skill sets to eight, and more suitable titles chosen. 
  • Inclusion of further existing units in the first draft qualification and change from Certificate II in Crocodile Care to Certificate III in Crocodile Care. This level better reflects the skill level required to perform the job roles.

Further details about changes are available below.

Summary of consultation to date

Thank you to those stakeholders who provided feedback on the draft documents that were made available from 07 February – 09 March, 2020, under the ‘Drafts Available’ stage. During this time, feedback was collected at six face-to-face consultation workshops, site visits, by webinar, via the online feedback hub, phone and email. The qualification, skill sets and units were drafted with guidance from Subject Matter Experts, made up of industry experts, including state park and national park rangers, crocodile research scientistscrocodile farmers, animal wranglers and RTOs 

Gathering advice and feedback from Indigenous Australians is a key element of this project, as their culture has respected crocodiles as entities and a source of food for thousands of years. Today, crocodile farming provides economic benefit for Traditional Owners through employment and royalty payments for egg collection on their land. Skills Impact is consulting with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples throughout this project.

For further insight into the earlier stages of consultation, as part of the ‘Development’ stage, click here to read about a visit to the Northern Territory. This sentence could also be the last sentence in the summary of consultation to date section.

A description of how feedback has been considered and applied in these final draft products can be downloaded below. Please click the ‘Download Summary of Feedback, Responses and Actions’ button. 

 

Feedback was sought on whether a crocodile specific qualification is needed. The advantage of having a nationally endorsed qualification is the ability to meet the skills needs of the crocodile care industry sectors and recognise the expertise of experienced crocodile care operators. However, concern was expressed about a shortage of RTOs available to deliver the proposed qualification and if it may impose a barrier to individuals already in the industry or soon to enter the industry, if it becomes a pre-requisite for registration for crocodile care operators. 

Qualification code and name Proposed changes Link
SFIXXX20 Certificate III in Crocodile Care The first draft qualification was drafted at as a Certificate II. Stakeholder feedback was adamant that the skill level required to perform the tasks is not level II. The work is high risk and often unsupervised or with minimal supervision. View final draft qualification

Click here to download a zipped folder of all skill sets in this group. 

Skill set code and name Proposed changes Link
SFISSXXX11 Care for Crocodiles in a controlled environment SFICRO4X2 Carry out crocodile breeding activities and SFICRO4X4 Capture, transport and release crocodiles over 2.5 metres, have been incorporated into SFICRO3X4 Care for crocodiles over 1.2 metres. SFICRO3X4 Care for crocodiles over 1.2 metres is included in this skill set. SFICRO4X5 is no longer part of this skills set as WA industry stakeholders suggested SFICRO4X6 Harvest crocodiles was more appropriate. View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX14 Crocodile egg harvesting The title has changed from ‘Crocodile egg harvesting with traditional landowners’ to enable broader uptake.  View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX15 Hatchling and juvenile crocodile care Crocodile hatchling care now incorporates care for juvenile crocodiles, this is more suited to industry work processes. View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX16 Crocodile incident This skill set is designed to provide individuals with skills and knowledge to take control and deal with incidents that involve crocodiles.   View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX17 Crocodile relocation This skill set is designed to provide individuals with skills and knowledge to transport and release crocodiles.  View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX18 Crocodile survey This skill set will comprise: SFICRO3X3 Conduct crocodile surveys, HLTAID005 Provide first aid in remote situations, SIRCOM002 Work effectively in a team, SFICOM2X1 Communicate effectively and SFIVOP202 Contribute to safe navigation.  View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX19 Crocodile public relations This skill set is designed for individuals who inform the public about crocodiles. The original title; Crocodile tourism was changed to the more appropriate Public Relations.  View final draft skill set
SFISSXXX20 Introduction to working with crocodiles This skill set is designed to provide individuals with skills and knowledge to commence working with crocodiles in a farming, research or wildlife environment and in Australian waterways. If the proposed certification is developed, this skill set is proposed to be the Core.  View final draft skill set

Click here to download a zipped folder of all skill sets in this group. 

Unit code and name Proposed changes Link
SFICOM2X1 Communicate remotely  Clear and culturally respectful communication is essential. Use of non-digital communication devices needs to be considered. View final draft unit
SFICRO2X1 Prepare to work with crocodiles An introductory unit encompassing the basic skills to work with crocodiles. View final draft unit
SFICRO2X5 Work safely in crocodile waterwaysUnit developed as a result of stakeholder feedback during first draft consultation. View final draft unit
SFICRO3X1 Support hatchery and juvenile careCare for juvenile crocodiles was added to the initial draft hatchery unit: SFICRO3X1 Support crocodile hatchery operations, so that the transferability of these skills could be recognised and duplications minimised.View final draft unit
SFICRO3X3 Conduct crocodile surveys Use of GPS was added to Performance criteria.View final draft unit
SFICRO3X4 Care for crocodiles over 1.2 metres in a controlled environment  Crocodile size references was amended from under 1.5 metres and over 1.5 metres to under 1.2 metres and over 1.2 metres as this was seen to be more appropriate as a distinction point.  View final draft unit
SFICRO4X1 Manage crocodile incidents This unit is essential for working with crocodiles. View final draft unit
SFICRO4X3 Harvest crocodile eggs Title change: removed ‘from the wild’ as eggs are also harvested in controlled environments. View final draft unit
SFICRO4X4 Capture, transport and release crocodiles Crocodile size references was amended from under 1.5 metres and over 1.5 metres to under 1.2 metres and over 1.2 metres as this was seen to be more appropriate as a distinction point. Reference to specific size was removed from this unit to better suit industry processes. View final draft unit
SFICRO4X5 Euthanise or destroy crocodiles Harvest crocodiles was removed from this unit. Harvesting is specific to crocodile farms, whereas the need for euthanasia or destruction is applicable to all crocodile environments. View final draft unit
SFICRO4X6 Harvest crocodiles Unit developed as a result of stakeholder feedback during first draft consultation. Reference to harvest were removed from SFICRO4X5 Euthanise or destroy crocodiles.View final draft unit

Unit code and name Rationale Link
SFIAQU216 Work with crocodilesThis unit is too all-encompassing. Industry requires greater specificity to address the full range of working with crocodile vocational functions. The decision to delete this unit was a unanimous decision made by the SMEWG and supported by stakeholders consulted. View unit on training.gov.au
SFIPRO3X3 Slaughter and process crocodiles Processing and slaughter is not part of the operations. Only two crocodile processing plants in Australia. Processing is covered by a meat code. The decision to delete this unit was raised by SMEs and feedback sought from broader industry. View unit on training.gov.au

 

Register your interest in the project

Subscribe to the Skills Impact newsletter to keep informed about project updates. Make sure to select ‘Aquaculture & Wild Catch’ as your industry of interest on the subscription form.

 

Finalisation

This stage has not yet commenced